Love of thunder

Tim Wells
4 min readAug 2, 2022

I don’t know about you, but I’ve always loved a good thunderstorm. Well, for my adult life anyway. I’m not sure I can recall one way or another how I felt about them as a child. Something about the sheer power on display during a thunderstorm is fascinating to me.

I’m not saying I’m about to take up storm chasing, although, I’m not not saying that either. I tend to appreciate a good storm from a place of relative safety. I can’t count the times I’ve sat out the back of my house and watched as a thunderstorm rolled past in the distance or how many times we’ve been smack in the middle of the swirling vortex of chaos.

Picking up a camera and heading outside isn’t something one normally thinks of doing perhaps as a storm approaches, but for me, it seems like the best thing to do. I’ve been going back over some photos I’ve taken in past of storms and thought I’d share some of those here.

Running from the storm.

I was on the Sunshine Coast in Queensland Australia one day, at the beach waiting for this storm that had been building offshore to see if I could catch some lightning or something interesting. I was sitting well up from the water, both for safety reasons and so I could make a quick getaway if I needed to. I’d setup the camera and was experimenting with some different exposures when I saw these surfers running up the sand toward the carpark behind me.

Running from the storm.

I had a slowish shutter speed set and they were moving reasonably quickly as they ran past. I sat and watched for a while longer without much action. A little rain, some wind but not much worth getting excited about.

Storm at the school.

One afternoon I pulled up at the kids school a little before pickup time. My youngest was still very young at the time and the school insisted that parents come in to collect the the little ones. I’d arrived a little early and reverse parked in the carpark for the perfect view of the approaching storm. It was flat like a pancake across the base with a hole in the center but above the flat disc to exploded upwards and outwards in chaos.

Needless to say it hit right around actual pickup time and caught us all…

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Tim Wells

Self taught software developer and photographer.